Bicycling helping people with Parkinson’s curb their symptoms

Image Credit: Matt McClain/Washington Post

As its title suggests, a January 10, 2012 feature article in The Washington Post (Bicycling and other exercise may help people with Parkinson’s curb their symptoms,) states “while it cannot cure Parkinson’s, heavy-duty exercise shows promise for countering, even delaying, the inability to move that the disease causes.”

In her article, Post reporter Alice Reid details results that medical researchers and Parkinson’s patients are seeing from regular, intense exercise (such as rowing and cycling)

The article notes that the National Parkinson Foundation “emphasizes exercise as an important tool to fight the disease,” and “The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research has funded close to $3 million in exercise research.”

Jay Alberts, the Cleveland Clinic researcher best known for his landmark work on “Forced Exercise” (cycling for Parkinson’s therapy) is quoted throughout the piece. A ‘just-completed study’ conducted by Alberts in which patients rode indoor bikes for exercise benefits is featured prominently.

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Parkinson’s Nutrition: Concerns & Recommendations

The Holiday Season is over!   With the New Year, it’s time to get back to healthy eating!

Proper nutrition for people with Parkinson’s disease is a recurring theme here at The Theracycle Blog.  Thus we’re glad to post a very informative write up on concerns and recommendations for Parkinson’s nutrition, courtesy of the California Parkinson’s Group (www.calparkinsons.org), whose mission is to “foster support and collaboration among friends and families with young onset Parkinson’s Disease through dialogue, education and involvement in the medical research community.”

Be sure to visit the CPG for a collection of useful PD materials and to participate in their forums: www.calparkinsons.org

Don't forget to eat your prunes!

Your mother always told you to “EAT YOUR PRUNES!” Read on to learn why and other helpful insights in “Significance of Nutrition in Parkinson’s” from our friends at the CPG.

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Groucho Marx: Parkinson’s Specialist

 

Marc Sherman is a 54 year old attorney who lives in Forrest Hills, NY. He describes himself as I “someone who loved childhood, and in a sense, never really left it.”

Diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2006 (an event that Marc says “should have caused me to leave childhood and become an adult,” Marc Sherman puts his legal expertise to work for The People with Parkinson’s Advisory Council of the National Parkinson’s Foundation. Marc is also the host of the Living with PD blog where he discusses his experiences living with Parkinson’s, often through witty parodies…

Forget the Mayo Brothers… Marc turned instead to The Marx Brothers for their diagostic and clinical expertise in treating his Parkinson’s disease, as you’ll read in his latest post:

A Night At The Doctors

 

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Who should be on your Parkinson’s care team?

A recent post on the blog of the National Parkinson’s Foundation asks a provocative question:

Will involving a neurologist in the care of a Parkinson’s disease patient makes a difference in outcome? 

In her post on the NPF blog entitled “The Case for All Parkinson’s Disease Patients to be Co-managed by a Primary Care-Neurologist Team,” Tennessee-based Cathy Whitlock calls attention to an interesting research paper that was published this summer in Neurology— the official journal of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN).

The August 30, 2011 Neurology paper, “Neurologist care in Parkinson disease: A utilization, outcomes, and survival study,” was authored by Allison Wright Willis, MD (Assistant Professor of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis) and her colleagues M. Shootman, B.A. Evanoff, J.S. Perlmutter, & B.A. Racette.

The paper and Cathy’s blog post are worth reading as they address the perennial question asked by PD patients: “What can I do to be sure I am getting the best possible treatment for my Parkinson’s disease,” with a response grounded in medical research to “make sure you are co-managed by both a neurologist and a primary care physician.”

While we think it’s important to also have a first-rate physical therapist with a knowledge of PD exercise therapies on a care team, this is a thought provoking question. Read Cathy’s article for more…

What do you think?

Cycling Aids Parkinson’s Diagnosis and Treatment

While The Theracycle Blog has principally focused on how stationery cycling can provide therapeutic benefits to people who live with Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, recently published research from a Japanese university suggests that the ability to ride a bicycle can help doctors determine whether the patient has Parkinson’s disease or atypical parkinsonism.

It’s somewhat ironic (I think) that research shows that cycling (of some kind), helps both in the diagnosis and the treatment of Parkinson’s symptoms.

Cycling Diagnoses Parkinson's Disease as Well as Treats Read a news story on Cycling Helps Parkinson’s Diagnosis from PressTV

Interestingly, the Wakayama Medical University “diagnosis of PD” study was also posted this week as a discussion topic in one of the excellent online public Forums hosted by the National Parkinson’s Foundation.

The person who posted that story, Kathrynne Holden, MS — is  a Registered Dietition specializing in Parkinson’s disease and nutrition.

Kathyrnne’s new book “Eat Well, Stay Well with Parkinson’s Disease” is available for download as a PDF from her website:  http://www.nutritionucanlivewith.com/

Her book and the Daily Tips on Parkinson’s nutrition on her site. are worth checking out. We look forward to introducing Kathyrnne to how riding a Theracycle has improved the lives of thousands of patients.