THERACYCLE… My “Wonder Drug”!

How easy it is to begin a day with an exercise program that gives me immediate satisfying results. I call it “instant gratification,” and that is what I experience when I use the Theracycle.

After experiencing months dealing with balance and gait issues, and suffering from many falls, in August of 2013 at the age of 68, I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease. Medication was prescribed, which seemed to help, but I continued to have occasional minor falls. At this time, the presence of Bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremors in my left hand were subtle. As these symptoms became more noticeable in 2015, another medication was prescribed. This medication does help but is not always effective for me and may wear off sooner than expected.

Through friends and network television news stories, my husband and I became aware of a surprisingly new discovery for the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease… The Theracycle. Both of us were very skeptical, but out of curiosity, we decided to research the bike and subsequently ordered it in the spring of 2016. When the bike arrived, I immediately began a passive regimen each day of cycling for 20-30 minutes at 12 mph. Within 2-3 weeks, I experienced improvement in my balance and have had no falls since I began using the Theracycle.

Within the past six months, I have discovered that the Theracycle helps my medication become effective quicker and last a little longer between doses. I now cycle for 60 minutes each day (a 10 minute warm-up, 40 minutes of voluntary cycling at 15 mph, followed by a 10 minute cool-down). I wish I could say the Theracycle has replaced my medication, but that is not the case. However, riding it for 15 minutes or so will “jump start” a dose of medication that is taking longer than it should to relieve the uncomfortable symptoms of rigidity and Bradykinesia. The Theracycle has become my “break through” prescription when I am experiencing “off” times with my ropinirole and carbidopa/levodopa.

The Theracycle was a sizable investment for my husband and me, but the benefits have far outweighed the cost. During the past 12 months, walking two blocks at one time has increased to almost two miles. The tremors in my left hand are almost non-existent. My medications work more efficiently. I have been able to continue my work as a part-time pharmacist technician. My strength, mobility, endurance and energy have all greatly improved, and at an age of almost 72, I feel much healthier than I did one year ago. I contribute all of these quality of life improvements to the Theracycle… which I now call my “Wonder Drug”!

— Willodean H., High Point, NC

Cycling away Parkinson’s tremors

Theracycle 200

If you or someone you love has Parkinson’s disease, I hope you’ve read our
eBook A New Therapy Brings Hope & Results to People with Parkinson’s Disease.

As a follow-on to that hopeful eBook, in February, we posted the first (of several to follow) personal accounts of people living with Parkinson’s Disease — the story of Dave Davenport.

Dave’s story and those of five others who’ve been riding a Theracycle and seeking substantial reductions in their PD symptoms are included in our newest eBook titled “First-person accounts of people now living better with Parkinson’s disease.”

If you’re interested in getting a copy of our “Living better with Parkinson’s disease” eBook, send me an email and I’ll be happy to send you one:

From that eBook, here’s a first-person account from Deb Snow of Wisconsin, who was diagnosed with PD 5 years ago, but who tells us riding her Theracycle has helped her to “do everything I used to do.”

Read on for Deb’s story…

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Life, Love, Relationships + Parkinson’s Disease

Kim & Rich Rosek

This week (first week of March 2012), Kim and Rich Rozek — the husband/wife team behind PD Talk Live!— are debuting a new weekly reality podcast on living with Parkinson’s Disease (PD):

Drawing on their experiences (since Rich was diagnosed with early-stage Parkinson’s circa 10 years ago,) the “Life, Love, Relationships and Parkinson’s” podcasts will give the couple’s personal perspective on living a high quality life and maintaining a successful marriage as they’ve navigated their family’s PD voyage.

Since Kim and Rich have “been there, done that,” they’re uniquely qualified to provide insights worth hearing.

To hear the podcasts and learn more about/and from Kim & Rich visit their website. Be sure to follow Rich on Twitter: @pdtalker.

Given that people are riding Theracycles across the country to alleviate their Parkinson’s symptoms, we look forward to listening!

Jim Wong: “How I Survived 18 Years of PD”

Californian Jim Wong was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease at age 42. Since his diagnosis he’s been a tireless champion for others with PD –someone we truly admire.

Educated as a bio-scientist at Princeton and Yale, Jim’s the past President of the California Parkinson’s Group, whom The Theracycle Blog has applauded in previous posts for its initiatives in PD dialogue, advocacy, education, and clinical participation.

Jim will be 61 in 2012, here’s his thoughts on how he survived 18 years of PD so far, with his recommendations for the  “Top 10 Things to do if you think you might have Parkinson’s, in chronological order”

Published originally on the Parkinson’s Movement Health Unlocked Blogsite in his article “How I survived 18 years of PD so far,” here (courtesy of Jim Wong) is his hard-won advice…. Take heed!


Top 10 Things to do if you think you might have Parkinson’s, in chronological order

By Jim Wong

1. Get every insurance policy you can (Life, Disability, Long-term care)

At the moment you are diagnosed, you lose all chance of getting more coverage.

2. Find a Movement Disorders Specialist 

You need an expert- not just your primary MD or a neurologist.

3. Optimize your living and working conditions for your best performance and safety 
An Occupational Therapist or Social Worker can survey your environment.

4. Find a local Support Group that suits you 

It helps to be with people who are walking in your shoes.

5. Participate in clinical trials 

I take 7000 pills a year, because people stepped up to test them. Pay this forward.

6. Keep a positive attitude 
Exercise, exercise, exercise – physical and mental;
Use it or lose it.

7. Tell people about your condition 
Don’t suffer alone in silence; Accept help when you need it.

8. Don’t work too long 

You will certainly do this.

9. Don’t drive too long 

You will certainly do this too.

10. Stay educated about the latest Parkinson’s research & therapies 

Everything is on the Internet, somewhere.
Knowledge is power and hope, day by day



Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro and other Parkinson’s Summits to Conquer

One of the blogs on our blogroll is “About Parkinson’s Disease” — an online destination we stop by from time to time. Operated by Robert Rodgers, Ph.D –who launched Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease back in 2005, this blog highlights five years of continuous interviews with people who have Parkinson’s Disease and which reveal there are many therapies that help people reverse symptoms.

Robert was inspired in his mission by the experience of his own mother who lost her battle with Parkinson’s in 1998.  Since then Robert is on a daily path to search for natural therapies that are safe and cause no harmful side effects. As he puts it: “I hold the belief that the body knows how to heal itself. It just needs a little help remembering how.”

While I highly recommend you check out Robert’s book “Road to Recovery From Parkinson’s Disease”, and read the variety of posts on his excellent About Parkinson’s Disease blog, one of his many interviews with PD people stands out for me….

Nan Little’s 2011 description of the adventure she and her husband experienced climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro with a group including climbers with Parkinson’s disease and others with multiple sclerosis inspired us to republish it here on our blog.

Many have written about their path through Parkinson’s– Nan Little’s led to the summit of the tallest mountain in Africa and her encouraging words:
“You don’t have to climb Kilimanjaro to be empowered…you can just get on a bike to experience freedom from some symptoms.”

Here from Robert Rogers’ blog is  Nan Little’s memoir of her inspiring trip to the summit and beyond…

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Jeff Jennings: “Despite Parkinson’s – what you can believe, you can achieve”

The ruggedly handsome man you see here is 51 year old Jeff Jennings of Greenville, South Carolina. While Jeff played football in college and competed in distance running (including the NYC Marathon in 1986), his life changed in 1996 when he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease at the age of 35.

Since then, as Jeff describes his life— he’s been living on “PST (Parkinsons Standard Time).” While a PD diagnosis might discourage some people— not Jeff!

Today Jeff’s one of of the most prolific and inspirational Parkinson’s bloggers on the Web. Jeff describes blogging as ” great therapy to be able to expose some vulnerabilities, face fears and perhaps bare your soul to good friends, as well as perfect strangers.”

Jeff’s articles cover the broad canvas of his life and chronicle his light-hearted look at a life with Parkinson’s and occasional musings on “How do I live with this disease?”

Reading Jeff’s blog — I’m impressed with his strong spirit, his refusal to be prideful, and his constant optimism to triumph in the midst of adversity including his past adventure of DBS (Deep Brain Stimulation) surgery.

Jeff has written “for exercise therapy to work, there going to be those times (probably many) when a good ration of self discipline will be make all the difference.” He also comments that the mental issues are tougher than the physical ones.

Honoring Jeff’s fighting spirit, the Theracycle Blog is proud to publish this article, written and contributed by Jeff Jennings, titled:

Visualization – The Power To See A Successful Outcome


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First-person accounts of people now living better with Parkinson’s disease.

From time to time the Theracycle team sends out articles and materials that we think may be informative and helpful. Recently, we created a new eBook titled “First-person accounts of people now living better with Parkinson’s disease.”

This new eBook details the personal stories of five people with Parkinson’s who’ve been riding a Theracycle and are experiencing the benefits of exercising on their Theracycle. They’re not only seeing substantial reductions in symptoms, but also improving their quality of life.

If you’re interested in getting a copy of the eBook, send me an email and I’ll be happy to send you one:

In the meantime, for a preview of the eBook click here to read the personal story of one of the 5 people profiled: Dave Davenport

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Susie’s Theracycle Story: M.S. Cycling Therapy at Home

Theracycle Motorized Exercise Bike

One of the most fulfilling things about being part of our work is receiving unsolicited messages from customers on how Theracycle exercise has improved the quality of their lives.

Susie Feldmeyer of Pennsylvania has been living with progressive Multiple Sclerosis for 11 years, and wrote us recently saying:

“My life has changed IMMENSELY since receiving the Theracycle!! 
I have been on the bike everyday but one, and every single thing I do has changed for the better.”

When Susie’s nurse practitioner recently told her she loves her Theracycle so much she should sell them for us, Susie replied saying “If I could drive I would be going to every physical therapy and Neurologist office this side of Pennsylvania.”

Whether for MS, for Parkinson’s disease or stroke — Theracycle customers have weighed in with enthusiastic testimonials on benefits they’ve seen from Theracycle exercise. From people with movement disorders like spinal cord injuries, arthritis or obesity who are Theracycling at home, to physicians, physical therapists and fitness specialties who recommend it to their patients — the Theracycle is getting rave reviews and powering inspiring stories of individual determination!

While we try to be ‘non-commercial’ on The Theracycle Blog, we can’t resist sharing Susie Feldmeyer’s Theracycle Story, in her own inspiring words…

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Art & Laughter as Parkinson’s Therapies

Anne's "Painting with Parkinson's" Group

Innovative therapies for people with Parkinson’s disease are originating and being practiced all over the world. From Australia via the Pacific Northwest comes this write-up “Art, laughter are therapy for PD group.” Written by Anne Atkin — volunteer, public speaker, ambassador and librarian with Australia-based Parkinson’s Victoria. as well as author of a new book: “Living and Laughing with Parkinsons”

Anne began her first “Painting with Parkinson’s” group in 2007, parlaying her love of art and experience as a teacher into benefit for others with Parkinson’s. Anne’s article was orginally published in the Nov/Dec 2011 issue of The Parkinson’s Post, bi-monthly newsletter of the Northwest Parkinson’s Foundation ( The mission of this Seattle-based organization is “to establish an optimal quality of life for the Northwest Parkinson’s community through awareness, education, advocacy and care.”

Special thanks to Ruth Egger of the NWPF for permission to reprint the article.

Here’s Anne Atkin’s article “Art, laughter are therapy for PD group”

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Parkinson’s Nutrition: Concerns & Recommendations

The Holiday Season is over!   With the New Year, it’s time to get back to healthy eating!

Proper nutrition for people with Parkinson’s disease is a recurring theme here at The Theracycle Blog.  Thus we’re glad to post a very informative write up on concerns and recommendations for Parkinson’s nutrition, courtesy of the California Parkinson’s Group (, whose mission is to “foster support and collaboration among friends and families with young onset Parkinson’s Disease through dialogue, education and involvement in the medical research community.”

Be sure to visit the CPG for a collection of useful PD materials and to participate in their forums:

Don't forget to eat your prunes!

Your mother always told you to “EAT YOUR PRUNES!” Read on to learn why and other helpful insights in “Significance of Nutrition in Parkinson’s” from our friends at the CPG.

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