Contact Congress Today to Save SBIR

Call or Email Congress NOW to Save SBIR

If you’ve been following the Theracycle Blog, you may know that we recently received a hard-to-land NIH-SBIR grant to fund research and product development of new Theracycles to benefit people with Parkinson’s disease..

What you may not know (but should)–  is that the 30 year old SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) program is a political hot potato on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Of real concern to us is the possibility of the expiration of SBIR programs on December 16, 2011!!

For all of you who share our belief in the importance of continued federal funding of SBIR, please read this urgent appeal from U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu with her clarion call for us to call or email our U.S. Representative to express our strong support to save SBIR…

Please Tweet this message to “Contact Congress Today to Save SBIR”  http://bit.ly/v01T87

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Forced Exercise Improves Motor Function in Parkinson’s Disease Patients

A significant number of visitors to the Theracycle Blog have told us they want to learn more about “Forced Exercise” and how research on has shown that “Forced Exercise” (FE) can improve motor function in Parkinson’s disease patients.

An overview of the initial FE research is found in the Abstract of the 2009 article written by J.L, Alberts, A.L. Ridgel & J.L. Vitek researchers at the Department of Biomedical Engineering of the Cleveland Clinic for their article  published in the July-August 2009 issue of Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, the Journal of the American Society of Neurorehabilitation.   Read the Abstract of the article and see the online link to that article here…


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Exercise: Particularly beneficial to Parkinson’s patients

In a recent NetDoctor article titled Exercise can be particularly beneficial to Parkinson’s patients” Dr. Michelle Gardner, research development manager at Parkinson’s UK, claimed that, although exercise is beneficial for everyone, it can offer extra advantages for those suffering from Parkinson’s.

Referencing research conducted by the UCSF School of Nursing and Red Hill Studios,  Dr. Gardner said “Many people with Parkinson’s struggle with gait and balance, and playing specially adapted computer games like those mentioned in the study holds real promise for assisting people with Parkinson’s to improve their coordination, regain confidence and become more physically active in day to day life.”

In recently winning its coveted NIH Grant for a Theracycle-driven regimen for Parkinson’s patients, the Theracycle team is building on the success of earlier research.

In 2010, the Red Hill Studios/UCSF Partnership received an NIH grant for $1.1 Million for computer-based physical therapy games for patients with PD. and cerebral palsy.

Fun and Games. Exercise and Health.

 

 

Who should be on your Parkinson’s care team?

A recent post on the blog of the National Parkinson’s Foundation asks a provocative question:

Will involving a neurologist in the care of a Parkinson’s disease patient makes a difference in outcome? 

In her post on the NPF blog entitled “The Case for All Parkinson’s Disease Patients to be Co-managed by a Primary Care-Neurologist Team,” Tennessee-based Cathy Whitlock calls attention to an interesting research paper that was published this summer in Neurology— the official journal of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN).

The August 30, 2011 Neurology paper, “Neurologist care in Parkinson disease: A utilization, outcomes, and survival study,” was authored by Allison Wright Willis, MD (Assistant Professor of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis) and her colleagues M. Shootman, B.A. Evanoff, J.S. Perlmutter, & B.A. Racette.

The paper and Cathy’s blog post are worth reading as they address the perennial question asked by PD patients: “What can I do to be sure I am getting the best possible treatment for my Parkinson’s disease,” with a response grounded in medical research to “make sure you are co-managed by both a neurologist and a primary care physician.”

While we think it’s important to also have a first-rate physical therapist with a knowledge of PD exercise therapies on a care team, this is a thought provoking question. Read Cathy’s article for more…

What do you think?

Cycling Aids Parkinson’s Diagnosis and Treatment

While The Theracycle Blog has principally focused on how stationery cycling can provide therapeutic benefits to people who live with Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, recently published research from a Japanese university suggests that the ability to ride a bicycle can help doctors determine whether the patient has Parkinson’s disease or atypical parkinsonism.

It’s somewhat ironic (I think) that research shows that cycling (of some kind), helps both in the diagnosis and the treatment of Parkinson’s symptoms.

Cycling Diagnoses Parkinson's Disease as Well as Treats Read a news story on Cycling Helps Parkinson’s Diagnosis from PressTV

Interestingly, the Wakayama Medical University “diagnosis of PD” study was also posted this week as a discussion topic in one of the excellent online public Forums hosted by the National Parkinson’s Foundation.

The person who posted that story, Kathrynne Holden, MS — is  a Registered Dietition specializing in Parkinson’s disease and nutrition.

Kathyrnne’s new book “Eat Well, Stay Well with Parkinson’s Disease” is available for download as a PDF from her website:  http://www.nutritionucanlivewith.com/

Her book and the Daily Tips on Parkinson’s nutrition on her site. are worth checking out. We look forward to introducing Kathyrnne to how riding a Theracycle has improved the lives of thousands of patients.