Delay the Disease – Exercise to Fight Parkinson’s Symptoms

Delay the Disease is a fitness plan and community-based exercise program designed to empower people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) to optimize their physical function.  Originating in Columbus, Ohio in 2007, Delay The Disease is quickly becoming a national phenomenon in the Parkinson’s prevention field, and is starting to become internationally acknowledged.

Delay the Disease founders (David Zid BA, ACE, APG and Jackie Russell, RN, BSN, CNOR) have expertise in working with individuals diagnosed with PD and offer training to other health care professionals nationally.  This program is based on current evidenced-based research, and Zid’s extensive experience with one/on/one training of people with PD.  Their goal is to demonstrate how exercise can change symptoms, foster optimism and allow individuals to maintain independence.  They believe that fighting this disease with hope is the key.

David and Jackie have spoken to over 20,000 People with Parkinson’s (PWP) and their families— at symposia, continuing education courses, and PWP workshops.

As PD affects the entire family, their programs focus on helping the individual, caring for the caregiver, and educating other healthcare professionals about the importance of Parkinson’s–specific exercise and therapy. They are passionate and enthusiastic that PD does not need to define a person; it can be managed with the appropriate “tools in the tool box of treatment”. And, as Jackie comments regularly “exercise is a very important tool.”

Delay the Disease is available in a book, and 2 DVDs. Learn more about Delay the Disease at www.delaythedisease.com.  Books and DVDs can be ordered from the website, or through Amazon.

Forced Exercise Improves Motor Function in Parkinson’s Disease Patients

A significant number of visitors to the Theracycle Blog have told us they want to learn more about “Forced Exercise” and how research on has shown that “Forced Exercise” (FE) can improve motor function in Parkinson’s disease patients.

An overview of the initial FE research is found in the Abstract of the 2009 article written by J.L, Alberts, A.L. Ridgel & J.L. Vitek researchers at the Department of Biomedical Engineering of the Cleveland Clinic for their article  published in the July-August 2009 issue of Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, the Journal of the American Society of Neurorehabilitation.   Read the Abstract of the article and see the online link to that article here…


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Help support “Ride With Larry” (A film of one man’s Parkinson’s journey)

A team of filmmakers, who all have loved ones with Parkinson’s, are creating the first film for the Parkinson’s community, by the Parkinson’s community that will help spark an international movement for research, awareness, and inspiration.

The film, Ride with Larry, follows Larry Smith, a retired police captain, now beloved small town baker, as he rides his bike across South Dakota, pushing his limits and expanding the boundary of possibilities for those with Parkinson’s disease. Weaved amongst the progress of Larry’s ride is an intimate portrait of the every day battle against Parkinson’s, the great minds working to find a cure, and the community love of Vermillion, SD that makes joined together to give Larry Smith one great ride.


The Exercycle Company (makers of the Theracycle) is a proud sponsor of Ride with Larry (including having furnished this Theracycle for Larry to work out on). We hope that readers of the Theracycle blog and others will join us in supporting this important film by contributing to the next state in its creation…

Read this message from Team Larry on how YOU can help!

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Exercise: Particularly beneficial to Parkinson’s patients

In a recent NetDoctor article titled Exercise can be particularly beneficial to Parkinson’s patients” Dr. Michelle Gardner, research development manager at Parkinson’s UK, claimed that, although exercise is beneficial for everyone, it can offer extra advantages for those suffering from Parkinson’s.

Referencing research conducted by the UCSF School of Nursing and Red Hill Studios,  Dr. Gardner said “Many people with Parkinson’s struggle with gait and balance, and playing specially adapted computer games like those mentioned in the study holds real promise for assisting people with Parkinson’s to improve their coordination, regain confidence and become more physically active in day to day life.”

In recently winning its coveted NIH Grant for a Theracycle-driven regimen for Parkinson’s patients, the Theracycle team is building on the success of earlier research.

In 2010, the Red Hill Studios/UCSF Partnership received an NIH grant for $1.1 Million for computer-based physical therapy games for patients with PD. and cerebral palsy.

Fun and Games. Exercise and Health.

 

 

Free eBook for People with Parkinson’s Disease

If you or someone you care about has Parkinson’s disease, you’ll be interested in reading a free new eBook on a successful new therapy that is helping people with PD substantially reduce their symptoms.

Entitled “How a New Therapy Brings Hope & Results to People with Parkinson’s Disease” click here to download the Free eBook from the Theracycle website.

 

Cycling Aids Parkinson’s Diagnosis and Treatment

While The Theracycle Blog has principally focused on how stationery cycling can provide therapeutic benefits to people who live with Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, recently published research from a Japanese university suggests that the ability to ride a bicycle can help doctors determine whether the patient has Parkinson’s disease or atypical parkinsonism.

It’s somewhat ironic (I think) that research shows that cycling (of some kind), helps both in the diagnosis and the treatment of Parkinson’s symptoms.

Cycling Diagnoses Parkinson's Disease as Well as Treats Read a news story on Cycling Helps Parkinson’s Diagnosis from PressTV

Interestingly, the Wakayama Medical University “diagnosis of PD” study was also posted this week as a discussion topic in one of the excellent online public Forums hosted by the National Parkinson’s Foundation.

The person who posted that story, Kathrynne Holden, MS — is  a Registered Dietition specializing in Parkinson’s disease and nutrition.

Kathyrnne’s new book “Eat Well, Stay Well with Parkinson’s Disease” is available for download as a PDF from her website:  http://www.nutritionucanlivewith.com/

Her book and the Daily Tips on Parkinson’s nutrition on her site. are worth checking out. We look forward to introducing Kathyrnne to how riding a Theracycle has improved the lives of thousands of patients.

“Welcome” from Peter Blumenthal – CEO, The Exercycle Company

Peter Blumenthal, CEO, The Exercycle Company:

I’m happy to welcome you to The Theracycle Blog.

While part of the charter of this blog is to increase awareness of our motorized exercise bicycle (the Theracycle), we’ve also launched the blog to inform, assist, inspire and interact with people with movement disorders,

Twelve years ago, I was severely injured when I was hit by a car while on a bicycle training ride.

My neck was fractured and there was a possibility that I would be paralyzed. Miraculously, after many months, I was restored to good health. During those long months of rehabilitation, I discovered how difficult it was to use traditional exercise equipment. Initially, I just did not have the strength or endurance to get the exercise that I wanted or needed.

After my recovery, I heard about a motor-assisted exercise bicycle that allowed people who shared my frustration with traditional exercise equipment to be able to exercise. The name of that exercise device was the Theracycle and it was made by the Exercycle Company in a town not too far away from me.

I researched both the company and the industry. I was intrigued to find out that they made a great product but very few people knew of its existence. I then took the bold step to buy the company. My goal was to inform people just like me, who needed exercise but did not have the strength to use regular exercise equipment, that there were solutions to their exercise needs.

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The Promise of “Forced Exercise”

Jay L. Alberts, Ph.D. Edward F. and Barbara A. Bell Family Endowed Chair Department of Biomedical Engineering The Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, Ohio USA)

While “Forced Exercise” sounds like something you’d have to endure as a member of a prison chain gang… it’s actually a very promising therapy introduced and validated by Jay Alberts, PhD — esteemed researcher at the Cleveland Clinic.

Dr. Alberts’ research and clinical trials have shown that cycling “done right” can significantly improve the conditions of people with Parkinson’s disease.

For more detail including video of a feature TV segment from NBC News on “Pedalling away Parkinson’s Symptoms” see our feature coverage of Cycling and Parkinson’s Disease.